Thigh girth, running style, knee replacements and pointed out feet.

A completely unscientific study of the knees of obese people watched while on holiday based on my knowledge through rectifying a recurring knee injury suffered back in the 1980s. In no way is this article anti obese people, it is merely an observation.

Background
I have, luckily, only ever suffered one running injury. Back around 1986 I started getting pain in the knee of my left leg, on the inside of the knee only. This got worse after a couple of marathons and ended by my leg locking up completely during the Swansea 10k resulting in me falling over, not being able to straighten my leg. My running colleagues at the Pontypridd Roadents said I had a strange running form but couldn’t explain further other than ” you run like a crab! ”
Shortly after that we moved to a new house at the top of two hills and this, coupled with my knee pain, pushed me into a break from running that lasted twenty five years.
My return to running came when my stepson told me he was going to run a marathon, instead of encouragement I laughed and told him that even at my age I could run further than him, he signed us both up for the Edinburgh Marathon without telling me.
My next birthday present from my wife was a series of lessons on how to run. Some people may have been offended but, on reading the pamphlet that came with the lessons, it explained that a trained person would video me running on a treadmill, discuss with me any issues and then work on rectifying those issues. In my case it was discovered that my knee problem came from my shoulder. That’s right, from my shoulder. My left shoulder dipped while I was running, making my left leg shorter than my right leg. To compensate I had to bend my left leg outwards putting strain on the inner knee every time I put my foot down. In case you can’t imagine that, think of someone being bow legged but only in the left leg.
Over a six week period we worked on my keeping my left shoulder up, running on a treadmill in front of a mirror and then taking that posture into road running. I now run with much better posture and only have to think where my left shoulder is when very tired at the end of a race or long run. Think Alastair Brownlee, now think much, much, much slower.
We then worked on foot placement as my right foot was facing forward in the direction I was running but my left foot was splayed outward, shooting off towards the left. This I had to concentrate on more while road running but eventually programmed my brain to have both feet facing forwards while running and also, as a bi product, while walking.

Observations
Two weeks in the sun on the island of Sal in the Cape Verde islands helps your brain relax and wander, much as it would do on a long run but for a much longer period. Because people in and around the beach were scantily clad, I started to notice their knee and foot placement. I had always imagined that there was a very simple equation that went – obese people are heavy which puts a strain on their knees which eventually forces a knee replacement operation. I soon discovered that obese people have larger than normal thigh girth and are unable to get their feet together. They can either walk with their feet apart, as if they have wet themselves, or bring their feet together by bending their legs and becoming bow legged. This bow leggedness reminded me of the shape of my left leg prior to rectifying my problem, I could see the strain on these people’s inner knees and wondered how long it would be before they had severe knee problems requiring a knee replacement.
Happy with this observation I started walking around with my head down looking at foot direction of everyone at the hotel. I discovered that the larger you are, the more your feet point outwards as you walk. Perhaps this is a natural reaction to someone who is wide, the extra width on foot placement stopping movement from side to side and thus the person falling over sideways.
I started to think that I was the only person on the island that walked with feet pointing forward and then noticed someone walking towards me with very straight, forward pointing feet. I wondered if it was a runner, looked up and saw the tee shirt “Munchen Halb Marathon”.

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